Maijuna Community-Based Conservation

Photo Credits:  Wilfredo Martinez/OnePlanet

Meet the Maijuna

We are pleased to support the conservation efforts of the indigenous Maijuna, one of the smallest and most vulnerable indigenous groups in the Peruvian Amazon.   Their amazing conservation journey is a story of persistence and resilience.

As guardians of nearly a million acres of rainforest, the Maijuna hold the key to a sustainable future for this critically important piece of the Amazon. And yet this very forest is under threat from a highway which would slash through its heart.  The inevitable result will be uncontrolled logging, poaching and colonization which will devastate biodiversity and decimate Maijuna culture.

Now, more than ever, the Maijuna need our help.

COVID-19 threatens not only their health but also their ability to fight the political and legal battles needed to prevent destruction of this invaluable region of the Amazon. Together we can sustain our Maijuna partners through this perilous time, take part in the fight against destruction of their homeland, and support educators in the US and Peru in drawing students into the adventure of learning and caring about the Amazon.

WATCH
Trailer: Guardians of the Forest
Screening of full-length film with filmmaker Q&A happening in February 2021!

Photo Credit:  Wilfredo Martinez/OnePlanet

Maijuna Curriculum Collaborative

In 2015, we formed a partnership with the Maijuna and the NGO, OnePlanet to share the Maijuna story with the world.   Through this effort, Maijuna community members began leading conservation and sustainability workshops for participants of our field courses.

The impact of these workshops was so powerful that it became clear that we needed to find ways to bring the Maijuna story out of the Amazon and into classrooms around the world.

Learn more about our collaboration with the Maijuna and why it matters:  Educating as if Survival Matters

Sustainability and Conservation Resource Guides

Using the Indigenous Maijuna's Amazon conservation story as a theme, these curriculum resources engage middle and high school students in grappling with complex real-world issues related to resource use, human rights, and conservation needs. 

Morpho Institute Amazon River in Peru (3)
Morpho Inst Squirrel Monkey
Morpho Inst ACTS at sunset

Examining Landscape Change

Students explore land use and land cover change at hotspots around the world, view satellite images to investigate deforestation in the Amazon, and use Google Earth to explore change over time in their home communities.

Treasuring the Amazon

Students become familiar with the value of the Amazon in supporting a vast diversity of species and an array of indigenous groups who have lived sustainably in the rainforest for thousands of years.

Investigating Ecosystem Services

Students explore the influence of the Amazon rainforest on global weather patterns, water cycling, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity and consider the impacts of deforestation.

Aiming for Sustainability, in the Amazon and at Home

Students explore the “Triple Bottom Line” as a way of thinking about sustainability – balancing the need to protect the natural environment while ensuring economic vitality and healthy communities.

Calculating Ecological Footprints

Students experience the tragedy of the commons, then calculate their ecological and/or carbon footprints and consider ways in which they might be able to modify their lifestyles in order to have a smaller impact on the planet.

 Exploring Food Choices

Students compare their day-to-day diets with those of people living in a relatively self-sufficient community in the Amazon rainforest. They consider ways to reduce the environmental footprint of American food choices.

Interrupted Case Studies on Community-based Conservation

Using these interrupted case studies, students will learn about the Maijuna indigenous people’s use of forest products, as an approach to community-based conservation in Peru. Students will take the perspective of a visitor to a Maijuna village to learn about their conservation success story and uncover how to be an agent of change in their home community. As the story unfolds, students are asked to answer questions, reflect on conservation in their local community, and finally participate in a citizen science project.

Maijuna Beekeeping

Grandmother Beekeeping with Granddaughters

Photo credit:  Elizabeth Benson/OnePlanet

Maijuna Palm Fruit Harvesting

RedFruits

Photo credit:  Wilfredo Martinez/OnePlanet

Maijuna Wildlife Management

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Photo credit:  Wilfredo Martinez/OnePlanet

Now more than ever, the Maijuna need our help

Together we can sustain our Maijuna partners through this perilous time, take part in the fight against destruction of their homeland, and support educators in the US and Peru in drawing students into the adventure of learning and caring about the Amazon.

Please join us in this critical work!

ICS 2018 (4)

Photo credit:  Christa Dillabaugh